First impression and overview: Re Factor Tactical Delta Trauma Kit

After using the HSGI Pogey pouch as an IFAK on my 1st Line for a couple of months, it became obvious that it wasn’t ideal.

I needed a “tear-away” pouch that could hold all my medical gear, excluding a TQ, and be low-profile, yet secure enough to mount on my belt.

Instagram came to the rescue! One of the few things I like about social media is the ability to meet and talk to like-minded individuals who, in some cases, have more knowledge about certain things. This time it was medical!

I’ve gotten many suggestions, from basic pouches to custom build ones. One of the suggestions, backed by input from a medic and a video review by the awesome Canadian Robo Murray, really caught my attention.

In comes the Re Factor Tactical Delta Trauma Kit!

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Description from the Re Factor Tactical website:

“The Delta Trauma Kit is a low-profile, minimalist kit designed to provide only essential medical items for treating life threatening wounds sustained on the battlefield.

Compatible with MOLLE or belt attachment, the kit can be worn overtly or covertly while maintaining a low-profile carry. The center red identifier pull-tab allows you quickly detach and open the kit under stress. The outside features a large carrying tab down the center of the pouch for ambidextrous access, and also includes velcro adhesive in addition to the buckle strap for added retention. Additional bungee straps have been included for the addition of a tourniquet on the bottom of the pouch. The interior is built with multiple elastic bands and slots for securing various sized pieces of equipment, including combat gauze, NPA’s, bandages, and other required items.”

Acquiring the Trauma Kit

To be honest, the pouch that was suggested and also reviewed by Robo was the Coyote Tactical Solutions STOMP. An amazing pouch with mostly the same features. I’ve been told that Coyote Tactical Solutions makes the Delta Trauma Kit for Re Factor Tactical.

Looking around on the internet, the STOMP wasn’t readily available in Europe and I didn’t want to pay an insane amount of import taxes.

Then an IG follower showed me the Delta Trauma Kit, a pouch that was in stock at the guys of Tactical Kit in the UK.

I immediately ordered two pouches: One in Coyote for “work” and one in Multicam for “play”. “Hello… I’m an gear-addict…”

Shipping was very fast and I got my gear in TWO days!

First impression

A compact and streamlined pouch that can carry a lot! It’s able to hold all the medical gear I had in the Pogey pouch and then some! I now have the ability to add some items, like a survival blanket and an additional gauze bandage if I want.

I’m also liking the belt attachment. It keeps the pouch securely attached without having to worry that you’d lose your live-saving kit!

I’m already liking the pouch, but will do a review of it after some use and training.

Overview

The exterior

The pouch measures 9 x 5″ or 22.9 x 12.7 cm. It’s a very sleek and streamlined design that is perfect to place in the small of your back.

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On the front there is a loop to pull the pouch away from the mounting and a square field of loop velcro to attach a medical patch.

On the back there is a big patch of hook velcro to securely attach it to the belt mounting.

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On the bottom, there are two drain holes where you can pull the included elastic cords trough. With these elastic cords you can secure a TQ to the bottom of the pouch.

The pouch is closed with a zipper that has red paracord to open it. I like to attach paracord to all my zippers, so it was nice that it came standard.

The interior

Here’s where the magic happens! The pouch lays completely flat when opened, so you have a clear view of everything inside.

The two sides of the pouch are configured differently.

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One has the elastic straps running vertically that have stitching across to hold decompression needles, NPA’s, sharpies and the likes. Behind the straps there is room enough for chest seals and Elastic Trauma Dressings (in my case the NAR ETD 6″).

The other side is where the Delta Trauma Kit differs from the STOMP. Here there is one elastic strap running horizontally, stitched to create 3 loops. Then there are two elastic straps running vertically to create the modularity to set up your kit to your needs. The horizontal straps are perfect for compressed gauze.

In the middle of the two compartments, there is an extra strap that can be used, in my example, for your gloves.

The mounting

The mounting for your belt is done by a MOLLE system with loop velcro on one side and a strap that keeps the pouch secured to your belt. It came with the MALICE clips to attach it. It’s a well thought-out system.

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Conclusion

The Delta Trauma Kit is definitely an upgrade to my old system. It’s low-profile, tear-away and holds everything it needs to.

If you’re in the market for a new IFAK pouch, you should take a look at this one!

~ FMB

Links:

Tactical Kit

Re Factor Tactical

 

The Delta Trauma Kit was not a sponsored item, my review and thoughts about the product are truthful and not funded.

 

 

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Equipment Series: 1st Line

1st lineTo start the 3-part series, it’s only logical to start with my 1st Line!

All lines are used to complete certain tasks.

Task

My first line is used to survive, escape & evade and fight. The “fight” part isn’t common for a 1st line but I have included it because I carry 2x 5.56 and 2x 5.7 magazines on my belt.

Location

Where do I put the items to survive, escape & evade and fight?

All the survive and escape & evasion items are in my clothing. The reason for this is that my pants and smock/combat shirt will be the last things I will drop.

although I really want to control naked one day…

My “fight” items are on my belt.

Contents

Survival, escape & evade

Survival tin/ E&E Kit
Waterproof Container
Signal mirror
Razor blades x2
Sewing kit (strong needles, cord)
Snare wire/string
Fishing kit (hooks,wire,weights)
Small candle
Waterproof matches
Condom
Magnesium & ferro rods (fire lighting)
Survival blanket
Cotton patches
 Medication (anti-diarrea, headache, …)
Pockets
Notebook and pencil
Lighter
Camo Cream
Small Air Marker Panel
Boonie hat
1:250 000 Map of Belgium
Sawyer Water Filter
Magnets (to hold up maps, air pictures)
Chalk
Extra Petzl headlight
Emergency Strobe Light
JFIRE

Fight

Belt (HSGI Suregrip)
5.7 Mag x2 (HSGI TACO)
SCAR Mag x2 (HSGI TACO)
FNH 5.7
Dump Pouch (WAS)
IFAK (HSGI) NAR Field Dressing
Chest Seal x2
NPA
ARS
Nitrile gloves
Shears
Permanent marker
TCCC Card
Flat Duct Tape
Compressed Gauze x2
Leatherman (WAS pouch)
GP Pouch (Spiritus Systems)
Chem lights (x2 IR, x2 Vis)
Krill Light IR (Not shown)
PRC-152 Batt (Not shown)
Petzl Headlight
MS2000
Spare Batt (AA, AAA, CR123) in container
Gloves (Mechanix)

The setup

Escape & evade

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Fight

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So that is my current first line. The dump pouch is a new addition to my belt and I will see if I like it. My first impression is good, so I’ll let you guys know.

If you guys have any questions, please let me know.

Update on FMB: I have some exiting news! After becoming a contributor to Spotter Up, an amazing community of writers from all backgrounds, I might start working together with a tactical gear company in their T&E program.

In due time I will keep you guys updated!

~FMB